Tag: youth initiatives

Tag: youth initiatives

Poverty and Depression as a Result of COVID-19 Has Affected The Youth In Kenya.

 

Covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, has adversely affected the mental and socioeconomic well-being of young Kenyans, a new survey reports.

The study, which was conducted by AMREF Health Africa between April 30 and May 5 across all the 47 counties, in alliance with the Ministry of Health, Population Council and Youth in Action, indicates that the effects of Covid-19, such as loss of jobs, have heightened stress levels among young people, worsening their mental and health well-being.

“Covid-19 is having significant negative effects on the mental health, economic and social status of the youth: nearly a third (27 percent) are experiencing more stress and 30 percent have reported living in fear,” the report notes.

SEE ALSO: The Corona Hairstyle Is Spreading An Important Message About Covid-19 In Kenya

 

 

youth unemployment in kenya

Economic Effects

The main source of worry and stress for young people is the reduction of income and complete loss of jobs amidst rising expenses, the report says.

This is as 50 percent of young Kenyans have suffered from a significantly reduced income whereas 22.9 percent of the Kenyan youth have lost their source of livelihood due to the virus epidemic.

The report also added, “34 percent of young Kenyans experienced increases expenses in the house and 33 percent experienced an increase in food prices, with more females than males experiencing an increase in household expenses (36.7 percent vs 31.9 percent) and increase in food prices (34.5 percent vs 32.6 percent”.

 

Ballooning violence

According to the findings of the report, the group also recorded an increase in violence at home. 1.7 percent of the respondents revealed that they have been victims of violence at home during the pandemic period.

The changes in normal roles and routines create stress for family members, including children who cannot attend school and may not know why they cannot.

Additionally, parents must struggle to strike a balance between explaining the pandemic to their children without heightening their fear.

For parents who also double up as health care workers, the conflict between being professionals and infecting their families become real.

These conflicts are likely to cause feelings of guilt, fear, and anxiety, among others.

Lastly, as home environments become toxic due to depressed affect, school closures, and diminishing resources among others, the odds of family violence increase.

 

SEE ALSO: Fighting Against Gender-Based Violence During The Covid-19 Pandemic in Kenya

 

Mental Health

Fear, worry, and stress are normal responses to perceived or real threats, and at times when we are faced with uncertainty or the unknown.

So it is normal and understandable that youth in Kenya are experiencing fear in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Added to the fear of contracting the virus in a pandemic such as COVID-19 are the significant changes to our daily lives as our movements are restricted in support of efforts to contain and slow down the spread of the virus.

Most are struggling with anxiety and depression because they are faced with new realities of working from home, temporary unemployment, home-schooling of children, and lack of physical contact with other family members, friends, and colleagues.

 

Police Brutality

At least six people died from police violence during the first 10 days of Kenya’s dusk-to-dawn curfew, imposed on March 27, 2020, to contain the spread of Covid-19. As of today, the number has shot up to 12 which includes children.

The police, without apparent justification, shot and beat people at markets or returning home from work, even before the daily start of the curfew.

Police have also broken into homes and shops, extorted money from residents, or looted food in locations across the country.

It is shocking that people are losing their lives and livelihoods while supposedly being protected from infection.

Police brutality isn’t just unlawful; it is also counterproductive in fighting the spread of the virus.

SEE ALSO:  Tips For Parents During The Coronavirus Outbreak – Infographics

 

Access To Medical Care

Five percent of women cannot access emergency pills or sanitary towels due to the movement restrictions, while eight percent of men reported a lack of access to condoms.

Youth with HIV have also been affected adversely, with 2.3 percent saying that Covid-19 has cut off their access to ARV medication and 4.7 percent noting that they are unable to access HIV/AIDS counseling.

Additionally, nearly half of the young people surveyed indicated that they would not be able to self-isolate if infected with Covid-19 due to reduced income or loss of jobs, which makes them unable to afford isolation.

Diseases will not also wait for coronavirus to be over!!

SEE ALSO: How To Manage Your Mental Health During Self Isolation

 

Conclusion

Regardless of these effects, the report shows that an overwhelming majority of young Kenyans are taking the necessary precautions.

They are adopting positive behavior to avoid infection with Covid-19, practicing hand hygiene, and wearing personal protective equipment since they started to receive messages on Covid-19.

For instance, 99 percent of young people are avoiding travel, 98 percent are using masks in public, 98 percent are washing hands, and 20 percent using hand sanitizers.

Little is known about the experiences of our people under public health protocols in terms of compliance, difficulties, and psychological impact.

The resulting interruption of filial and other bonds due to fears about infecting self and others, and/or avoidance behaviors during and post-isolation are issues of concern to social scientists.

Further, public health protocols that directly contradict long-held traditions, for instance, concerning how and when burials are to be conducted has ramifications for their success.

Finally, fear of social stigma for those infected may cause people to deny early symptoms and consequently fail at early diagnosis.

It is important to note that early diagnosis is essential for the management of a new disease as COVID-19.

Therefore, it is important to understand how people perceive interventions and what psychological mechanisms are triggered by coercive measures.

 

Match Made in Heaven/ How Our Nonprofit partners with the Church.

It so sad that the Love of money has penetrated deeply in churches today.

Ministries are being measured by their monetary worth and even Christians value each other in terms of financial capabilities and this fully angers God.

But this is not the case for Pastor David Camp and his wife and Assistant Pastor Paulette Camp of Agape Apostolic Church in Troy New York.

We cannot be grateful enough for how much our partnership with this church has brought joy to the lives of people in the community.

Service is a part of our vision at Protect A girls Image Organization.

We have a community development model that requires us to have long-term relationships and collaborations with local organizations, churches, and stakeholders committed to transform our community.

We believe the justice of God is always restorative. God is constantly working to restore systems, communities, families, and humanity.

For us to be a just and generous Organization, we serve as a way to partner with God in bringing restoration to all things.

Agape Church of Deliverance believes that there is ONE LORD, ONE FAITH AND ONE BAPTISM.

They teach and believe that Jesus is Lord and they invite everyone to a Holy Ghost filled Anointed Services where God’s unconditional LOVE (AGAPE) saturates the atmosphere!

Our goal of forming relationships with a church or community overseas is to deepen our connection as Christians.

It helps us to better educate each other about what life is like in a different country/culture.

We have become involved in each other’s efforts to make our communities closer to the vision that God has for us.

We believe that everyone has been given gifts and resources by God.

These resources (material, spiritual, emotional, relational, financial, and others) should be used for the greater good of God’s kingdom.

We see close relationships between distant churches as a way to share the resources and knowledge that we have with each other.

Why Should a Non-Profit partner with a Church?

  • Our Organization and Agape Church’s relationship can help us both express our unity in Christ which transcends national, ethnic, economic, linguistic and other barriers.
  • We are both encouraged as we see God working in one another.
  • Agape Church and our Organization serve as we use our spiritual gifts, skills, abilities, and professional knowledge.
  • We both experience Spiritual growth, Revitalization and Community transformation.
  • Agape Church has played a big role in encouraging and supporting us.
  • Creative and innovative ministries are limitless.

 

RELATED CONTENT: Protect A Girls Image In Collaboration with the Church in Providing Hospice Services.

PGIO Lynden Church Hospice

 

Agape Apostolic church in New York has partnered with Protect A Girls Image in the following ways:

 

EDUCATION

Effects of Poverty on Education in Kirinyaga County- Kenya.

PGIO believes that the best way to build a stronger Africa is to foster future African leaders from diverse backgrounds.

We find bright children living on the edges of society and provides them with long-term, quality education, leadership, and critical thinking skills.

We provide them with resources they need to become leaders in their communities and beyond. Our beneficiaries come from families stricken by AIDS, Illiteracy, and poverty.

They don’t lack ambition, they only need resources to make their dreams come true – that’s where we come in!

We have very kind sponsors from Agape Church who have made a great impact on educating our Beneficiaries. We have also run a crowdfunding campaign to raise school fees for our beneficiaries.

They have provided promising children an opportunity to attend the best local schools in the region, where they gain the skills and confidence to become leaders.

 

SCRIPTURES/ EVANGELISM

Evangelism

Agape Church always reminds us that each of us is created in the image of God, filled with potential and worth.

As we respond to God’s call to care for our brothers and sisters in poverty, we seek to celebrate their inherent, God-breathed value.

Traditional models of charity often emphasize what those in poverty lack—overlooking their unique skills, abilities, and drive.

We believe that a scriptural approach affirms the dignity and value of those we seek to help.

We believe families in poverty have the God-given talents and skills to provide for their families.

What they don’t have is a lump sum of money to invest in their potential—by paying school fees, saving for the future, or investing in businesses.

 

ADVOCACY

PGIO Advocacy Work

Pastor Paulette Camp has a great influence on the Grass-roots level. She runs a ministry called “I AM MY SISTER’S KEEPER”. It is an uplifting and motivational Program that seeks to advocate for random acts of kindness to women. Paulette Camp also encourages us to push Advocacy work here in Kenya.

We have worked together to influence the decisions, policies, and practices of powerful decision-makers. We are advocating for change where they will address underlying causes of poverty in Kirinyaga County, bring justice and support good development.

Through our pieces of training, initiatives, and programs, the Organization builds community capacity to mobilize civic action.

 

EMPOWERMENT

Empowerment

The Church started an Initiative called the Agape Sparkles Youth Program. The Program strives to build the strength of the community by empowering youth to maximize their spiritual, personal, and educational potential.

The mission is to teach, lead and live the Christian life, using all appropriate methods to excite, inspire, capture and ignite young people for Jesus.

PGIO also works to empower our community and beneficiaries by giving them the tools to help themselves break out of the cycle of generational poverty. We educate children about sexual consent, the importance of staying in school and to our girls we teach about menstrual hygiene.

Our work is all about DEVELOPMENT, not charity; DIGNITY, not shame.

We believe all humans are created in the image of God. We will always promote the dignity and worth of people and families.

 

FOOD

PGIO Food Drive

Agape Church has a Bread of life community outreach program run by Minister Anthony Lewis.

They give free food and supplies to members of the Community every 4th Saturday of every month from 11 am to 3 pm.

PGIO also plays a big role in feeding the poor in Kirinyaga County.

We have scheduled outreach programs where we distribute maize flour, sugar, cooking oil, rice, beans, soap, tissue, and tea leaves just to mention a few.

We distribute clothes, shoes, underwear, and jackets too for the cold seasons. We believe that if a child is well fed and clothed, he or she will be able to stay in school. We don’t underestimate the power of a hot meal in a child’s life.

 

INCASE YOU MISSED IT:

An Incredible Story Of Child Marriage.

10 Ways to Teach Your Children Consent at Every Age.

Catcalling is Not A Compliment, It’s Harassment.

 

SUMMARY

When we are drawn to respond to a particular area of suffering and need, we reflect the heart of our Heavenly Father, who is grieved by all forms of injustice.

Protect A Girls Image, through Christ-centered economic development, addresses the root of many issues like child marriage, illiteracy, hunger, and homelessness by dealing with the underlying causes of poverty and hopelessness.

Together we can share the love of God in word and deed, building His Kingdom and growing our faith as we invite Him to work through us.

Our Girl Susan Wambui always says, “I am so grateful that Jesus heard my prayers and sent a sponsor to provide an education that has changed my life.”

We pray that through the many Ministries offered by PGIO, that many lives will be changed, in ways to restore people to Jesus Christ and provide hope for a bright future.

Jesus gave us the blueprint when he said these words “a new commandment I give to you, that you love one another, as I have loved you, that you also love one another. By this, all will know that you are my disciples if you have a love for one another”

John 13:34-35

 

Catcalling is not a Compliment, It’s Harassment!!

When I go to the shop every morning, our gate man and his friends will not let a lady pass by the gate without uttering words like “mrembo leo hunisalimii?”- “Beautiful come and say hi”. You can imagine how you look in the morning – baggy t-shirt or hoodie, sweatpants or tights, and they still catcall us which is very irritating. Most of the times I just pass by without saying anything or when am in a good mood I just wave and move along.

I am sure millions of women and girls around the world will have heard phrases like that. “Hey Sexy!” “Hey Beautiful!” “Ouh your body this or that!” or something like it. Some might say that it’s harmless, just a joke, or perhaps even a compliment.

But to be honest catcalling is none of those things. It’s an explicit demonstration of power, one that is intended to frighten or intimidate the person it’s addressed to. It is based in deep-rooted gender inequality, which sees women’s bodies as not their own.

 

In my opinion, in the context of gender, harassment often ends up being a way for men to exert control over women and their bodies. Shouting a crude comment about a woman’s appearance suggests entitlement to her body. Groping or stalking or simply standing too close without a woman’s permission shows entitlement to her space. Expecting a woman to talk to you while or after you harass her displays entitlement to her time. Do You Agree?

 

What is Catcalling?

Catcalling is when an individual whistles, shouts, or makes sexual comments toward another individual as they are walking by. Women are often the ones faced with having to deal with this ridiculous issue. The fact that I get a little nervous when I decide to get dressed up because I don’t feel like getting harassed, is a problem. You shouldn’t have to feel self-conscious or nervous every time you get dressed to head out the door or every time you pass by men on the street.

What is Street Harassment?

Street harassment is one of the most pervasive forms of violence against women and girls. It’s a type of sexual harassment and includes catcalling, unwanted comments, gestures, honking and uninvited sexual advances from strangers in a public place.

When you face harassment as part of your daily life, whether it’s while going for a run or getting the bus to see friends, what does that do? It holds you back right?

You are compelled to change your clothes, or routes to work just to try to avoid it. It can even  prevent you from working, from socialising, from learning, and from living with freedom and dignity.

This is not acceptable. No woman or girl should feel afraid in the streets of her own city.

Did you Know Poverty makes girls more vulnerable to harassment??

We help and interact with many women and girls in the rural areas we operate and they have stories to tell about street harassment. One would think thank living in the rural areas is a bit safer than urban areas but we were wrong.

Women and girls living in poverty are even more vulnerable to this sort of street harassment. For example, Rose Wanjiru attends a local school in Kangai village, Kenya. She is only 12 years old, but she and her friends are often harassed by men as they walk to and from school. Rose says:

“On my way home, we often get catcalls from the farm workers and boda boda [motorcycle taxi] riders. My biggest wish is that we get an education, the men should leave us alone.”

 

RELATED CONTENT: See How we are Raising Funds to help our Beneficiaries like Rose to stay in school.

How Protect a Girls Image is helping girls who are experiencing street harassment.

Jackline Wamwitha, Our eldest girl belongs to the Protect a Girls Image-supported girls’ club at her school. The club is a safe spacewhere the girls learn about their rights and gain the confidence to report harassment and abuse. Jackline looks out for other girls at school. She says: “I tell my friends: don’t pay attention to those men.”

In addition to girls’ clubs, Protect a Girls Image is working with women’s groups and training government officials, police, health workers and legal advisers in Kenya on how to best to tackle violence against women and girls.

By working closely with local commuities, PGIO is tackling gender-based street harassment at its root, by challenging the behaviours and gender inequalities that cause it.

 

READ MORE: Our Visit to Kangai Sunday School  Support Club. – Talks on Menstruation, Sex, Consent and Safety.

 

How Should You Deal with Street Harassment?

 Ignore It

Sometimes, no response is the best response (especially if you’re concerned about escalating the situation). Some harassers might enjoy any sort of attention, so ignoring the foolishness is the best bet. Hopefully, they will eventually get a clue and stop catcalling completely.

 Respond

If you’re a quick thinker with a strong voice, then responding may be a good choice. If you feel safe enough to do so, assertively respond to the harassers calmly, firmly and without insults or personal attacks to let them know that their actions are unwelcome, unacceptable and wrong. It’s one way to turn the situation around.

Show Compassion

Sometimes kindness is the most unexpected, confusing, and wonderful response of all. So if some guy is saying garbage about your appearance, you can respond with quiet sympathy. “You must be in a bad place to comment on stranger’s bodies like that. I hope life gets better for you.” You can say, with full sincerity. Then sashay away!

Report to Employer

If you are being harassed at work you can air your views and let Human Resources know that their employees are harassing people on the job and why that is unacceptable. I know you might be thinking “what will my colleagues think and what if I lose my job” If we don’t start standing up for ourselves now then when?

Step In

If you see a lady being harassed, please help them out of the situation and let the harasser know that their actions are not condoned by others. Ask her if she wants help and what she’d like you to do or simply check in to see if she is OK. Majority of street harassers look to other men for approval so they might gang up on you.

 

What will you Do to Help Girls facing Street Harassment??

If you Donate to Protect A Girls’ Image Education Funding>>>HERE, you can help us support more Girls in School, so that they can be educated on preventing and responding to harassment and violence. Here’s what your money could do:

  • $80  could help educate girls and ensure they are aware of their rights
  • $5 could help girls carry their books to school.
  • $10 could help get a Dozen of Books for each girl, to write down everything  they learn.
  • $3 could help buy a Dozen of Pens for them to write with.

 

SUMMARY

The most common defense that men have against this issue is that catcalls are their way of “complimenting” a woman’s looks. Going up to a woman and telling her she’s beautiful is one thing, but shouting “damn!” “hey sexy!” or whistling and honking the car horn as a woman walks by is a different story.

Catcalling can even get to the point of being dangerous if women decide defend themselves or ignore the cat-callers, because often they will get offended causing them to act in an aggressive or intimidating manner by name calling or going as far as assaulting women. It’s important that you assess your situation and ensure your safety before responding.

What men need to understand is that catcalling is not cute, funny, or complimenting. It’s harassment, degrading, and disgusting. It lets women know they are being objectified and looked at as nothing more than a piece of meat. It makes women feel as though they have no rights or values. Women are not dogs to be whistled at and they are not sexual objects. Women are more than their looks. Women have the right to be treated with as much respect and dignity when walking down the street as any man. Women deserve to feel safe!!

RELATED CONTENT

Ten Ways to Teach your Children Consent at every Age.

Ten Tips on how Parents can Help Children who have experienced Trauma.

Skills that Dad’s should teach their 13year Old Daughters in 2020.

 

Top 7 things you need to teach your child about sex and consent.

Being a parent is compiled of so many firsts and big moments you look forward to with your children. One of them most parents do not look forward to is Sex Education. Most parents find this conversation very uncomfortable. Let’s face it, my generation really didn’t get much talks as our parent’s generation did not talk about Sex at all!! But in this generation, I am surprised that 10 year olds know about Sex and it’s not from our parents, but from the internet, movies and magazines.