Tag: povertyeradication

Tag: povertyeradication

Poverty and Depression as a Result of COVID-19 Has Affected The Youth In Kenya.

 

Covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, has adversely affected the mental and socioeconomic well-being of young Kenyans, a new survey reports.

The study, which was conducted by AMREF Health Africa between April 30 and May 5 across all the 47 counties, in alliance with the Ministry of Health, Population Council and Youth in Action, indicates that the effects of Covid-19, such as loss of jobs, have heightened stress levels among young people, worsening their mental and health well-being.

“Covid-19 is having significant negative effects on the mental health, economic and social status of the youth: nearly a third (27 percent) are experiencing more stress and 30 percent have reported living in fear,” the report notes.

SEE ALSO: The Corona Hairstyle Is Spreading An Important Message About Covid-19 In Kenya

 

 

youth unemployment in kenya

Economic Effects

The main source of worry and stress for young people is the reduction of income and complete loss of jobs amidst rising expenses, the report says.

This is as 50 percent of young Kenyans have suffered from a significantly reduced income whereas 22.9 percent of the Kenyan youth have lost their source of livelihood due to the virus epidemic.

The report also added, “34 percent of young Kenyans experienced increases expenses in the house and 33 percent experienced an increase in food prices, with more females than males experiencing an increase in household expenses (36.7 percent vs 31.9 percent) and increase in food prices (34.5 percent vs 32.6 percent”.

 

Ballooning violence

According to the findings of the report, the group also recorded an increase in violence at home. 1.7 percent of the respondents revealed that they have been victims of violence at home during the pandemic period.

The changes in normal roles and routines create stress for family members, including children who cannot attend school and may not know why they cannot.

Additionally, parents must struggle to strike a balance between explaining the pandemic to their children without heightening their fear.

For parents who also double up as health care workers, the conflict between being professionals and infecting their families become real.

These conflicts are likely to cause feelings of guilt, fear, and anxiety, among others.

Lastly, as home environments become toxic due to depressed affect, school closures, and diminishing resources among others, the odds of family violence increase.

 

SEE ALSO: Fighting Against Gender-Based Violence During The Covid-19 Pandemic in Kenya

 

Mental Health

Fear, worry, and stress are normal responses to perceived or real threats, and at times when we are faced with uncertainty or the unknown.

So it is normal and understandable that youth in Kenya are experiencing fear in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Added to the fear of contracting the virus in a pandemic such as COVID-19 are the significant changes to our daily lives as our movements are restricted in support of efforts to contain and slow down the spread of the virus.

Most are struggling with anxiety and depression because they are faced with new realities of working from home, temporary unemployment, home-schooling of children, and lack of physical contact with other family members, friends, and colleagues.

 

Police Brutality

At least six people died from police violence during the first 10 days of Kenya’s dusk-to-dawn curfew, imposed on March 27, 2020, to contain the spread of Covid-19. As of today, the number has shot up to 12 which includes children.

The police, without apparent justification, shot and beat people at markets or returning home from work, even before the daily start of the curfew.

Police have also broken into homes and shops, extorted money from residents, or looted food in locations across the country.

It is shocking that people are losing their lives and livelihoods while supposedly being protected from infection.

Police brutality isn’t just unlawful; it is also counterproductive in fighting the spread of the virus.

SEE ALSO:  Tips For Parents During The Coronavirus Outbreak – Infographics

 

Access To Medical Care

Five percent of women cannot access emergency pills or sanitary towels due to the movement restrictions, while eight percent of men reported a lack of access to condoms.

Youth with HIV have also been affected adversely, with 2.3 percent saying that Covid-19 has cut off their access to ARV medication and 4.7 percent noting that they are unable to access HIV/AIDS counseling.

Additionally, nearly half of the young people surveyed indicated that they would not be able to self-isolate if infected with Covid-19 due to reduced income or loss of jobs, which makes them unable to afford isolation.

Diseases will not also wait for coronavirus to be over!!

SEE ALSO: How To Manage Your Mental Health During Self Isolation

 

Conclusion

Regardless of these effects, the report shows that an overwhelming majority of young Kenyans are taking the necessary precautions.

They are adopting positive behavior to avoid infection with Covid-19, practicing hand hygiene, and wearing personal protective equipment since they started to receive messages on Covid-19.

For instance, 99 percent of young people are avoiding travel, 98 percent are using masks in public, 98 percent are washing hands, and 20 percent using hand sanitizers.

Little is known about the experiences of our people under public health protocols in terms of compliance, difficulties, and psychological impact.

The resulting interruption of filial and other bonds due to fears about infecting self and others, and/or avoidance behaviors during and post-isolation are issues of concern to social scientists.

Further, public health protocols that directly contradict long-held traditions, for instance, concerning how and when burials are to be conducted has ramifications for their success.

Finally, fear of social stigma for those infected may cause people to deny early symptoms and consequently fail at early diagnosis.

It is important to note that early diagnosis is essential for the management of a new disease as COVID-19.

Therefore, it is important to understand how people perceive interventions and what psychological mechanisms are triggered by coercive measures.

 

Donating Food As A Response To Coronavirus/ The Church and Non-profits.

In Kenya, the Protect A Girl Organization is still providing food and supplies to up to 40 different families in Kirinyaga County. The organization is delivering care packages with food and other resources to the community.

food donations for coronavirus

 

There is a great need for food assistance during this COVID-19 outbreak.

That is why our teams, both here in Kenya and in the USA are doing the best we can to help those in need.

Many local churches we collaborate with are also active in encouraging their members involved in helping others.

One good example is the Agape Apostolic Church of Deliverance in Troy, New York.

Under the Strong Leadership of Pastor David Camp and his wife and Assistant Pastor Paulette Camp, the church came together to start a drive-thru food pantry to help community members impacted by the coronavirus outbreak. Both Pastors have served in ministry at the  Church for approximately 28 years.

The church places emphasis on family unity.  Among the various forms of outreach, the church reaches out to the poor and needy in the community with “The Bread of Life Community Outreach Program” (food pantry), an Annual Community & Fellowship Fun Day, and the annual Friends & Family Community Backpack and School Supplies Giveaway.   Agape Apostolic Church of Deliverance has successfully given away over 2,500 bibles in alms bags to date.  The church is rapidly growing and God is a blessing.

The pantry, called “The Bread of Life,” is under the leadership Minister Anthony Lewis.

 

He coordinated with the church and volunteers to put on Saturday morning’s distribution of bags of food from their pantry.

The church said they’ve served up to 400 families since the coronavirus pandemic began.

“So we usually do it just once a month but you know now, we’re pretty much doing it at least two or three times a week making deliveries,” said Minister Anthony Lewis.

The church’s community outreach program said anyone who’s struggling should not be afraid to reach out.

agape apostolic church food pantry

agape apostolic church food pantry

Minister Anthony Lewis quotes “I want to first thank our great Pastor and Assistant Pastor Elder David Camp and Evangelist Paulette Camp for their vision in starting the Agape Bread Of Life Community Outreach Program and how the Saints of Agape and Community Volunteers unselfishly gave their time to come out on such an awesome day to serve the community. We gave out tons of food and supplies to so many families in need. As always God Be the Glory!”

So many people in the US have filed for unemployment assistance in the past five weeks, as the coronavirus pandemic closes businesses and keeps residents mostly indoors. Even before the coronavirus outbreak, 37 million people in the US struggled to find enough to eat according to Feeding America.

They had lines of cars waiting to get food donations from the pantry.

agape apostolic church food pantry

 

“Don’t be anxious about anything; rather, bring up all of your requests to God in your prayers and petitions, along with giving thanks. Then the peace of God that exceeds all understanding will keep your hearts and minds safe in Christ Jesus.” — Philippians 4:6–7

 

Protect A Girls Image dedicates our resources, platforms, and will to make the biggest impact on people with the greatest need. This moment is an opportunity to illuminate how we are all affected when some of us lack the protections of a safety net. By focusing on the needs of people most impacted, we can better ensure the health and safety of all communities.

To learn more about the response in your community and how you can help, find us Here.

Protect a girls image coronavirus food donations

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Match Made in Heaven/ How Our Nonprofit partners with the Church.

It so sad that the Love of money has penetrated deeply in churches today.

Ministries are being measured by their monetary worth and even Christians value each other in terms of financial capabilities and this fully angers God.

But this is not the case for Pastor David Camp and his wife and Assistant Pastor Paulette Camp of Agape Apostolic Church in Troy New York.

We cannot be grateful enough for how much our partnership with this church has brought joy to the lives of people in the community.

Service is a part of our vision at Protect A girls Image Organization.

We have a community development model that requires us to have long-term relationships and collaborations with local organizations, churches, and stakeholders committed to transform our community.

We believe the justice of God is always restorative. God is constantly working to restore systems, communities, families, and humanity.

For us to be a just and generous Organization, we serve as a way to partner with God in bringing restoration to all things.

Agape Church of Deliverance believes that there is ONE LORD, ONE FAITH AND ONE BAPTISM.

They teach and believe that Jesus is Lord and they invite everyone to a Holy Ghost filled Anointed Services where God’s unconditional LOVE (AGAPE) saturates the atmosphere!

Our goal of forming relationships with a church or community overseas is to deepen our connection as Christians.

It helps us to better educate each other about what life is like in a different country/culture.

We have become involved in each other’s efforts to make our communities closer to the vision that God has for us.

We believe that everyone has been given gifts and resources by God.

These resources (material, spiritual, emotional, relational, financial, and others) should be used for the greater good of God’s kingdom.

We see close relationships between distant churches as a way to share the resources and knowledge that we have with each other.

Why Should a Non-Profit partner with a Church?

  • Our Organization and Agape Church’s relationship can help us both express our unity in Christ which transcends national, ethnic, economic, linguistic and other barriers.
  • We are both encouraged as we see God working in one another.
  • Agape Church and our Organization serve as we use our spiritual gifts, skills, abilities, and professional knowledge.
  • We both experience Spiritual growth, Revitalization and Community transformation.
  • Agape Church has played a big role in encouraging and supporting us.
  • Creative and innovative ministries are limitless.

 

RELATED CONTENT: Protect A Girls Image In Collaboration with the Church in Providing Hospice Services.

PGIO Lynden Church Hospice

 

Agape Apostolic church in New York has partnered with Protect A Girls Image in the following ways:

 

EDUCATION

Effects of Poverty on Education in Kirinyaga County- Kenya.

PGIO believes that the best way to build a stronger Africa is to foster future African leaders from diverse backgrounds.

We find bright children living on the edges of society and provides them with long-term, quality education, leadership, and critical thinking skills.

We provide them with resources they need to become leaders in their communities and beyond. Our beneficiaries come from families stricken by AIDS, Illiteracy, and poverty.

They don’t lack ambition, they only need resources to make their dreams come true – that’s where we come in!

We have very kind sponsors from Agape Church who have made a great impact on educating our Beneficiaries. We have also run a crowdfunding campaign to raise school fees for our beneficiaries.

They have provided promising children an opportunity to attend the best local schools in the region, where they gain the skills and confidence to become leaders.

 

SCRIPTURES/ EVANGELISM

Evangelism

Agape Church always reminds us that each of us is created in the image of God, filled with potential and worth.

As we respond to God’s call to care for our brothers and sisters in poverty, we seek to celebrate their inherent, God-breathed value.

Traditional models of charity often emphasize what those in poverty lack—overlooking their unique skills, abilities, and drive.

We believe that a scriptural approach affirms the dignity and value of those we seek to help.

We believe families in poverty have the God-given talents and skills to provide for their families.

What they don’t have is a lump sum of money to invest in their potential—by paying school fees, saving for the future, or investing in businesses.

 

ADVOCACY

PGIO Advocacy Work

Pastor Paulette Camp has a great influence on the Grass-roots level. She runs a ministry called “I AM MY SISTER’S KEEPER”. It is an uplifting and motivational Program that seeks to advocate for random acts of kindness to women. Paulette Camp also encourages us to push Advocacy work here in Kenya.

We have worked together to influence the decisions, policies, and practices of powerful decision-makers. We are advocating for change where they will address underlying causes of poverty in Kirinyaga County, bring justice and support good development.

Through our pieces of training, initiatives, and programs, the Organization builds community capacity to mobilize civic action.

 

EMPOWERMENT

Empowerment

The Church started an Initiative called the Agape Sparkles Youth Program. The Program strives to build the strength of the community by empowering youth to maximize their spiritual, personal, and educational potential.

The mission is to teach, lead and live the Christian life, using all appropriate methods to excite, inspire, capture and ignite young people for Jesus.

PGIO also works to empower our community and beneficiaries by giving them the tools to help themselves break out of the cycle of generational poverty. We educate children about sexual consent, the importance of staying in school and to our girls we teach about menstrual hygiene.

Our work is all about DEVELOPMENT, not charity; DIGNITY, not shame.

We believe all humans are created in the image of God. We will always promote the dignity and worth of people and families.

 

FOOD

PGIO Food Drive

Agape Church has a Bread of life community outreach program run by Minister Anthony Lewis.

They give free food and supplies to members of the Community every 4th Saturday of every month from 11 am to 3 pm.

PGIO also plays a big role in feeding the poor in Kirinyaga County.

We have scheduled outreach programs where we distribute maize flour, sugar, cooking oil, rice, beans, soap, tissue, and tea leaves just to mention a few.

We distribute clothes, shoes, underwear, and jackets too for the cold seasons. We believe that if a child is well fed and clothed, he or she will be able to stay in school. We don’t underestimate the power of a hot meal in a child’s life.

 

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SUMMARY

When we are drawn to respond to a particular area of suffering and need, we reflect the heart of our Heavenly Father, who is grieved by all forms of injustice.

Protect A Girls Image, through Christ-centered economic development, addresses the root of many issues like child marriage, illiteracy, hunger, and homelessness by dealing with the underlying causes of poverty and hopelessness.

Together we can share the love of God in word and deed, building His Kingdom and growing our faith as we invite Him to work through us.

Our Girl Susan Wambui always says, “I am so grateful that Jesus heard my prayers and sent a sponsor to provide an education that has changed my life.”

We pray that through the many Ministries offered by PGIO, that many lives will be changed, in ways to restore people to Jesus Christ and provide hope for a bright future.

Jesus gave us the blueprint when he said these words “a new commandment I give to you, that you love one another, as I have loved you, that you also love one another. By this, all will know that you are my disciples if you have a love for one another”

John 13:34-35

 

An Incredible Story of Child Marriage.

Evah Wambui – 19 years old – got pregnant when she was 16 years old in high school. Having a typical African mother, she was asked to go live with the boy who got her pregnant.

This is how the life of Evah as a child bride began. She went ahead and lived with her boyfriend’s family who mistreated her for bringing “shame” into their family.

All this time, her boyfriend stayed in school.

After she gave birth, she could not bear the ridicule and so she went back to her mother’s house.

Evah’s mother accepted her on the condition that she had to work on people’s farms as a casual laborer to feed her child.

Evah’s story is just one of the many in Kenya.

Child Marriage is still rampant in Kenya, especially among rural communities. It affects both boys and girls but girls are more affected due to socio-economic and cultural factors.

According to the Demographic Health Survey (DHS) 2014, 4% of girls were married by the age of 15 years while 23% were married by the age of 18 years in Kenya.

However, child marriage rates vary across regions with North Eastern and Coast regions having the highest prevalence rates, while the Central region and Nairobi have the lowest rates.

Girls married early are exposed to lifetime violence and are entrapped in the cycle of poverty. Child brides often live in isolation, dependent on their husbands and with little access to education, health or protection from violence and abuse.

What’s the child marriage rate? How big of an issue is child marriage?

In Kenya the legal age of marriage is eighteen years (18) and above, 43.3% percent of girls get married before they attain this age. The main reasons are poverty, tradition and gender inequality.

Just imagine this, If nothing is done to change this trend, an estimated 70 million girls will be married as children over the next five years. This translates to tens of thousands of girls every day.

We have a Mission here at Protect A Girls’ Image.

We continue to encourage parents and community members about the importance of education and the need not only to send their children to school but also to ensure that they complete the school cycle.

Teacher Wanjiku, a Senior teacher of Kangai Primary School, says “slowly but surely, parents are beginning to see the importance of education for their children. It is only through education that we can eradicate poverty. We need to involve other communities in Kirinyaga County to embrace the project and continue to encourage both boys and girls to complete the school cycle.”

 

Where rape turns to marriage.

In other cases, parents reach an agreement with the families of men who sexually assault their daughters so that both families save face.

Waithera (name withheld) was walking home from school shortly after dusk when she was grabbed and taken into her father’s maize farm.

The culprit named Njoroge raped her and when she reported this to her father, he informed the area chief who held the suspect for two days.

Meanwhile, the chief, Waithera’s father, and Njoroge’s family met and agreed that they get married since she was “no longer innocent”. The girl’s opinion did not count.

It may be difficult to imagine that there are still communities where such barbaric practices are legal. But the reality is that it remains widespread – particularly in developing nations.

 

RELATED CONTENT: Ten Ways to Teach Your Children About Consent at Every Age.

What causes child marriage to happen and what are the effects?

What causes child marriage and the effects

The causes of child marriage are complex and varied, motivated by different factors across communities and regions – sometimes, even within the same country.

Child marriage is often driven by engrained traditions and poverty. 

For struggling families, their best chance of survival may require marrying their daughters off, just because they can’t afford to keep them. Overwhelmingly, child brides come from the world’s most impoverished communities.

Poverty.

Within these contexts, girls (and women) aren’t seen as potential wage earners. Rather, they are financial burdens to their families and consequently, less valuable than boys.

For parents with several children or living in extreme poverty, child marriage is simply a way to help alleviate the desperate economic conditions they find themselves in.

It’s one less mouth to feed and one less education to fund.

Sometimes, girls are married to help offset debts, settle conflicts or as a substitute for money.

Worse still, families may have no choice but to arrange a younger daughter’s marriage along with her sister’s, if a cheaper “package deal” can be had.

There are so many ways in which child marriage creates economic incentives for young girls to be married off early – whether for financial security or gain.

Sadly, the practice also tends to trap these girls into a lifetime of economic disadvantage.

Poverty is one of the key causes of child marriage, but it’s also an ongoing consequence.

Robbed of the chance to grow, learn and fully realize her potential, child brides are disempowered.

Tradition.

Child marriage can also be influenced by norms and beliefs. In some societies, marriage is nothing more than a phase of womanhood.

Once menstruation starts, a girl is seen as a grown woman, so the logical next steps for her in life are marriage and motherhood.

Younger girls may also be perceived as more amenable, more easily shaped into an obedient wife.

In many cultures, girls who have lost their virginity are considered “ruined” or “unsuitable” for marriage.

Parents may arrange a union for their daughter while she is young to ensure she remains a virgin and to maximize her child-bearing years.

Survival.

For other families, forced child marriage is a survival strategy.

If they cannot afford to feed and educate all of their children, marrying off the girls would be “the next best thing” to starving, while also allowing them to give preference to boys’ schooling.

Education.

Child marriage statistics show that girls who aren’t in school face a greater risk of becoming child brides.

Girls who have no education are three times more likely to marry before 18 than girls who attended secondary school or higher.

When girls have access to education, they develop the knowledge and confidence to make important life decisions for themselves – including if, when and who to marry.

Even for those in school, early marriage can significantly impact a girl’s ability to continue with education.

Many are forced to drop out in order to focus on domestic responsibilities or to raise children of their own.

Parents and community leaders may see education as unnecessary for their primary roles in life as a wife and mother.

Adolescent pregnancy.

Child marriage is seen as a safeguard against immoral behavior.

A 2012 Plan study shows that parents in Kilifi and Kwale married off pregnant daughters to protect their family status and name, and to receive both dowry and a “penalty” payment from the man responsible for the pregnancy.

Children are respected more when their mother is married, and become ng’ide awi (children of the home) rather than ng’ide akeor (children of the field).

Among Kuria communities, young pregnant girls are sometimes married off to older women who cannot bear sons, in a tradition known as Nyumba boke.

Partying.

The practice of partying at discos after funerals or in local centers has also been cited as a driver of teenage pregnancy which sees girls drop out of school and seek early marriage.

 

What are our measures in eradicating child marriage?

Apart from Raising School Fees for children to go back to School in Kangai Village, we are implementing ways on how to tame and end child marriage in Kenya. They are the following:

  • Implementation of the Children Act
  • Creating awareness of the effects of child marriage.
  • Involving fathers.
  • Adequate Funding.
  • Mentorship.
  • Reporting cases of child marriage.
  • Delaying child marriage by taking the girls to school.

Protect A Girls’ Image pledges to link up with many strong groups and do more than we currently do to enable communities to have the knowledge to abandon this practice and pursue the Goal of having an Educated generation.

 

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Effects of Poverty on Education in Kirinyaga County- Kenya.

 

Juliet Wanja, Doreen Karimi  and Christine Wanjiru are all 15 year old girls who are not sure if they will join High School in 2020 due to lack of school fees. This is a reality for thousands of children in Kenya right now. Currently, the Kenyan primary education is free but still regular school attendance is a challenge mainly due to low family incomes.

For instance, over 1.2 million children of school-going age are out of school and involved in practices such as child labor to supplement family income. There is also a 27% primary school dropout rate related to poverty issues. Imagine having these challenges in primary education. We find that fewer children are enrolled in secondary school, with only about a 40% enrollment rate.

Ending poverty in all of its form everywhere is crucial to achieving sustainable development in the world. We encourage various stakeholders to invest in education of our Beneficiaries because there is a lot to be gained in terms of poverty alleviation since poverty is a challenge to education.

It’s a bit ironic that we are fighting for our children to go to school while at the same time, our poor quality education is another one of the causes of poverty in Kenya. A high number of children are cramped together in classrooms, there are minimal teaching materials and each class has a single teacher.

With a poor teacher to student ratio, children who learn differently end up getting left behind because the teacher does not have a chance to serve each child individually. Those children who are left behind remain enrolled in school until they can catch up, adding to the amount of resources needed, since there is not an even ratio of new students to graduated students.

However, Protect a Girls’ Image Organization believes that education has a direct correlation with income. The higher the level of education, the less likely the person is to fall below poverty line.

Educating girls in particular makes them more likely to take control of decisions relating to fertility, family welfare, health. This means that education is not just a need but a tool to alleviate poverty.

With Donations from well wishers like you in place this shouldn’t be a problem. It seems simple enough – at least on the face of it. Every child in our care between the ages of six and 17 has the right to compulsory education and this cannot happen without your kind donations.

Have you seen our latest Fundraising Campaign for School Fees for our 40 children in our care? Click Here>>>  https://t.co/rFenbUMW4w

 

What is the right to education?

Education is a basic human right for all and is important for everyone to make the most of their lives. Other human rights include the right to freedom from slavery or torture and to a fair trial.

Having an education helps people to access all of their other human rights. Education improves an individual’s chances in life and helps to tackle poverty.

 

Why does it matter?

Education reduces poverty, decreases social inequalities, empowers children and helps each individual reach their full potential.

It also brings significant economic returns for a country and helps societies to achieve lasting peace and sustainable development. Education is key to achieving all other human rights.

Education that targets poor populations like where our children live will bring change to many of the systemic factors that have contributed to the delay in poor communities’ development. Education can prevent the transmission of poverty between generations. Education also has documented effect on health, nutrition, economic development and on environmental protection (UNESCO 2104: Sustainable development begins with education).

Our goal in 2020 is to make sure all our children are enrolled in school with all the supplies which include ( school fees, a school bag, books, and writing materials)

Despite great progress we have made this year, 12 out of our 40 children are still not enrolled in school.

Would you like to help one of these children to be enrolled in school? We will be so grateful if you Give trough this link>>>>>>  https://t.co/rFenbUMW4w

 

 REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD INVEST IN A CHILD’S EDUCATION.

Investing in Education yields significant development benefits.

Education reduces poverty, boosts economic growth and increases income. It increases a person’s chances of having a healthy life, reduces maternal deaths, and combats diseases such as HIV and AIDS. Education can promote gender equality, reduce child marriage, and promote peace. In sum, education is one of the most important investments a country can make in its people and its future.

Education is essential to the success of every one of the 17 global goals.

Formally adopted at the UN General Assembly in September 2015, the Global Goals for Sustainable Development frame the global development agenda for 2016-2030. The Global Goal 4 on education aims to “ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all.”

Education is Critical during times of conflict.

In times of conflict and crisis, children are forced out of school, which contributes to higher drop-out rates and lower completion rates. Having a strong focus on education in these countries is critical, since education promotes stability, good governance, and peace. It can also provide a visible sign of a return to normalcy for children.

A Poor quality education is almost like no education.

Great progress has been achieved in enrolling children in school around the world. But it’s not enough to get children in school, we also need to ensure that they learn to read, count, and acquire the necessary life skills. A special focus has to be given to the most vulnerable and marginalized groups (including children living in fragile and conflict affected areas, children with disabilities and girls) who are most likely to be affected because of a lack of well-trained  teachers, inadequate learning materials, and unsuitable education infrastructure.

Achieving the Global Goal for education by 2030 cost US $1.25 a day per child in Developing countries.

It costs on average US $1.25  a day per child in developing countries (low and lower-middle income) to provide a full cycle of pre-primary through secondary education (13 years). The largest share of this cost, 88%, is borne by the developing countries themselves. The international community should help in filling the funding gap of just 15 cents a day per child.

Education has a multiplier effect.

Educated girls and women tend to be healthier, have fewer children, earn more income and provide better health care for themselves and their future children. These benefits also are transmitted from generation to generation and across communities at large, making girls’ education one of the best investments a country can make.

Children with disabilities are often excluded from education systems.

In many countries, a combination of discrimination, social attitudes, poverty, lack of political will, and poor quality of human and material resources leave children with disabilities more vulnerable to being excluded from education. It is essential that societies adapt their education systems to ensure that these children can enjoy their basic human right without discrimination of any kind.

Early childhood education is vital to lifelong success.

Investing in quality early childhood education brings the highest returns from individuals, societies and countries. Children who have access to quality early childhood programs do better in primary school and will have better education outcomes later. It is vital that low and lower middle-income countries invest more in affordable early childhood programs.

Read More: Operation: Help Send our 17 boys and 23 girls back to School in 2020.

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Case Study: Meet Marion, a PGIO Beneficiary

Meet Marion Wikale, a form One student In Nile Road Day Secondary School in Jericho, Makadara District. Nile Road Secondary School was not her dream high School but a school she found herself in due to unavoidable circumstances. She had first been admitted to A few months before Marion had to join High School, she had to deal with the emotional stress of her father who she really idolized leaving their family for another woman. Her mother, Teresiah Waruguru had to step up as the sole breadwinner. Marion could not join the School she had been accepted to despite her good grades. Like any other firstborn, she was worried about her mother’s emotional state, being unemployed and her capabilities of providing for the family, let alone pay for a Boarding School. Marion, therefore, settled to attend a Day School near home since it was cheaper and she could look out for her mother. The School is way below her potential since she is very bright and proactive.

Teresiah Waruguru, Marion’s mother was abandoned by her husband ( a Doctor)just when Marion was about to join High School. Teresiah is a high school drop-out and so it has been difficult for her to land a job with a stable income so she has resorted to doing casual jobs like doing laundry, vending food like chapattis and mandazis, and any other casual job she can do just to put food on the table. She is therefore incapable of paying school fees for her two daughters Marion and Angela who is still at Middle School.

Protect Girls Image has provided psychosocial support for the family especially Marion who has really been affected by her Father’s absence and the drastic change in the quality of life. She fell into Depression, had self-esteem issues and was isolating herself. One of our counselors had sessions with her for therapy every week where she learned to cope and be positive despite her circumstances.

71% of High School Drop Outs come from Fatherless homes. It is no guarantee that children with involved Dads won’t struggle in school. However, when the Dad is not in the picture, the feeling of abandonment leaves a child unable to trust and leads to behavioral issues, depression, likely to be sexually active at a young age and likely to abuse drugs.

As much as the psychosocial support she has received from PGIO has helped, she still is suffering due to lack of school fees. She misses her classes a lot after being sent home and catching up becomes difficult. Marion needs stability in her education since she is very bright and would like to help her family and society after becoming a successful Engineer.

If you would like to help in any way with Marion’s case, please scroll down to the Donate Button or Contact the Organization through info@protectagirlsimage.org . Every Dollar/ Shilling Counts.