Tag: capacity building

Tag: capacity building

The ‘Corona Hairstyle’ Is Spreading an Important Message About COVID-19 in Kenya.

Who could have imagined that a Simple Hairstyle would become a conversation starter and fundraising tool for COVID-19? 

Necessity is the mother of invention!

These women in Kibera Slum, an Informal settlement in Nairobi, Kenya are using a hairstyle to raise Awareness about Coronavirus.

Its called the “Coronavirus Hairstyle”.

The “corona hairstyle” is shaped just like the virus: it has long spikes and a small circular crown.

Other hairstylists hope it will bring much-needed community awareness about the pandemic in this area.

Some salons in Kibera Slum charge 1 dollar to make a hairstyle very popular amongst children in Kibera.

This in turn sends a message of awareness about the new virus.

 

Corona hairstyle

Jane Mbone, 7, arrives home after having her hair styled in the shape of the new coronavirus at the Mama Brayo Beauty Salon in the Kibera slum.

 

A hairstyle that has popularly been around Africa for many years has become much more than a look in Nairobi, Kenya.

Kenya currently has 715 cases of COVID-19 and has put measures into effect to combat the pandemic, such as implementing curfews and releasing of prisoners.

Hairstyles have historically carried meaning in Africa, from revealing a wearer’s relationship status to their family’s social standing.

Variations of the “corona hairstyle” have been plaited from generation to generation.

Sharon Refa, a hairstylist in the slum feels that there still needs to be aware of how to protect oneself and others from coronavirus.

coronavirus hairstyle

 

 

“Many Slumdwellers don’t believe that the coronavirus is real,” Refa said.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends regularly washing hands with water and soap or cleaning them with a sanitizer.

They also recommend wearing masks and social distancing when in public.

But another challenge Kenya faces in its fight against COVID-19 is lack of clean water and sanitation.

According to Water.org, a digital platform that advocates for access to water and sanitation, 41% of Kenyans get their water supply from ponds, shallow wells, and rivers, while 71% of the population lack access to sanitation. The challenges are even more pronounced in slums like Kibera.

Refa added that many adults in her community are reluctant to wear masks or use hand sanitizer, which is why she and her colleagues came up with the “corona hairstyle,”. The hairstyle also helps in communicating with the public about the virus.

The corona hairstyle is a way to be stylish on a seriously tight budget. Millions of people across the world have lost their jobs, food security, and businesses as a result of COVID-19.

The most affected sectors are transport, aviation, hospitality and tourism, manufacturing, wholesale and trade, agriculture, and the informal sector.

In Kenya, 83% of total employment in 2018 was in the informal sector.

The reality of the toll Covid-19 is taking on the economy is only beginning to hit home, with 133,657 Kenyans said to have been rendered jobless.

Nonprofits are also doing the best they can to create awareness and help where they can in terms of food, water, soap, and sanitary effects.

Which are some of the innovative ways you have seen that have been used to create awareness about COVID-19? Feel Free to Share in the comments below.

 

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An Incredible Story of Child Marriage.

 

 

Coronavirus and COVID-19: How We Are Caregiving for the Elderly.

Protect A Girls’ Image Organization takes pride in taking care of the elderly.

We have members of our organization who collaborate with hospices in Lynden Washington USA to take care of them.

When this Coronavirus Pandemic began, we were really worried because research showed that the elderly are the most vulnerable.

Research is showing that adults 60 and older, especially those with preexisting medical conditions, especially heart disease, lung disease, diabetes, or cancer are more likely to have severe — even deadly — coronavirus infection than other age groups.

While we have no control over certain risk factors such as age and while questions remain unanswered, there is much we can do to prepare and protect ourselves, our families, and our communities.

Our work in the industry is facing unprecedented pressure due to the recent COVID-19 outbreak.

Should the situation continue, we have created a contingency plan to support all the elderly people who are in our care now or may need care in the coming months.

I want to give you a few tips and guidance from some of our experts at PGIO on what you can do to help your loved ones during this time.

Keep yourself well.

First and most important, as a caretaker you should take all the precautions you can to avoid becoming infected yourself. Here are the basics:

  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds before and after providing care, preparing food, using the bathroom, or touching surfaces in public places.
  • Avoid crowds, and if you cough or sneeze, do so into the bend of your elbow or into a disposable tissue.
  • Keep your hands away from your face.
  • Clean frequently touched surfaces in your home often, including mobility and medical equipment used by your loved one, such as walkers, canes and handrails.

We Practice social and physical distancing but not social isolation.

One important way to lower the risk of your older family members catching COVID-19 is to limit in-person visits. But this may be tough for older adults who cherish time spent with friends and family members.

Our CEO Margaret Wangui says, “Social distancing doesn’t have to mean isolation or loneliness. We need to keep older adults safe, but also keep in mind that social isolation can have a negative impact on older people’s  immunity and mental health.”

She notes that in terms of social contacts, seniors should be encouraged to think beyond their usual circle of friends and family. “Saying hello to the mail carrier or checking in on neighbors close by can add to a sense of connectedness,” Margaret says.

With many houses of worship closing their doors until the pandemic eases, congregants, especially older ones, may feel cut off. “Faith communities are often a big part of older adults’ social lives,” Wangui says. Caregivers might help their loved one access online services and outreach for spiritual solace and support.”

We Use Technology for Staying Connected.

We have really tried to help older residents feel involved, purposeful, and less lonely during the pandemic. This is how we do it:

  • We show them how to video chat with others using smartphones, laptops, or tablets.
  • We use apps on these devices to provide captions for adults with hearing challenges.
  • We encourage friends and family outside of the household to telephone, write notes, or send cards to lift their loved one’s spirits.

We Keep elders involved.

Arbaje recommends giving homebound older adults a project they can work on.

“Think about going through and organizing old photos and memories together, and enjoy the stories and happy memories they inspire.

It can be a good time for an elder to demonstrate cooking a favorite family recipe or share favorite songs or movies with other people in the household.”

We Minimize the risk of COVID-19 infection.

We have really tried to postpone unnecessary doctor visits.

If an older adult in our care is feeling well, we consider helping them postpone elective procedures, annual checkups, and other non-essential doctor visits.

We keep in mind that many older people, especially those living with chronic illness, have important relationships with their caregivers.

To help them stay in touch, we ask their doctors’ offices if they offer telemedicine which enables doctors and patients to communicate over the video, email, or other means rather than face-to-face.

We decide on a plan.

We try as much as possible to involve the older family members in discussions of how they will manage interruptions of routines and what will happen if they (or someone else in your family) becomes sick.

Talking things through ahead of time as a family can reduce stress and help everyone feel more involved and prepared.

We normally pick an emergency contact.

If you’re the main caregiver, designate someone nearby whom you could rely on to care for your elderly family member if you yourself become ill.

We keep regular medications and other supplies well-stocked.

Given the vulnerability of older individuals and those with chronic conditions, we recommend that you should have access to several weeks of medications and supplies in case they need to stay home.

Monitor food and other medical supplies needed and create a plan in the event that such resources become depleted.

For families, know what medications your loved one is taking and see if you can help them have extra to hand.

We have gathered one to three months of medications, and at least two weeks’ worth of food, over-the-counter remedies, pet supplies, and other essentials.

It is also good to find out which delivery services are available in your area.

If there are symptoms or exposure? Call ahead.

If you or your loved one learn that you might have been exposed to someone diagnosed with COVID-19 or if anyone in your household develops symptoms such as cough, fever, or shortness of breath, call your family doctor, nurse helpline, or urgent care facility.

For a medical emergency such as severe shortness of breath or high fever, please call 719 or text *719# which is a toll-free number provided by the Government of Kenya.

You can also call the following County Hotline numbers 0800721316 (tollfree) / 0732353535.

We respond to multigenerational living situations.

Some of our households are multigenerational, with different people at different levels of risk residing under one roof.

Households, therefore, will need to consider the risks of all its members.

One important consideration is that many older adults live in homes where other members, such as children, may have frequent colds.

Your family institute can change now by not sharing personal items like food, water bottles, and utensils.

If possible, choose a room in your home that can be used to separate sick household members from those who are healthy. If possible, also choose a bathroom for the sick person to use.

We keep abreast of essential, up-to-date information.

The situation with COVID-19 is changing rapidly.

For example, in some areas, China has moved from in-home quarantine and isolation to dedicated facilities for suspect cases and others for confirmed cases.

That means everyone should find and regularly check a trusted information source such as the WHO’s dedicated website or their national public health agency.

Protect A Girls’ Image Organization continues to work with public health authorities to identify specific coronavirus related issues relevant to the over 50s.

Meantime, in this setting of well-founded concern, occasionally unfounded fears and rapidly evolving dynamics, it’s always important to remember your health basics for a strong mind and body: maintain a healthy lifestyle, which includes engaging in moderate exercise, keeping a healthy diet and getting regular sleep.

Household clusters of COVID-19 infections demonstrate the virus can spread more easily among people living under the same roof.

However, with planning, and incorporating additional steps as more information emerges, together we can try to minimize the impact of the COVID-19.

I hope all these tips help you when it comes to taking care of your elderly loved ones. If you have any questions or contributions, feel free to share in the comments below.

We have more amazing content here:

How To Talk to Children and Help Them Cope With Changes Resulting From COVID-19.

Match Made In Heaven- How Our Nonprofit Partners With A Church.

6 Tips On How To Nurture A Childs’ Mental Health.

Match Made in Heaven/ How Our Nonprofit partners with the Church.

It so sad that the Love of money has penetrated deeply in churches today.

Ministries are being measured by their monetary worth and even Christians value each other in terms of financial capabilities and this fully angers God.

But this is not the case for Pastor David Camp and his wife and Assistant Pastor Paulette Camp of Agape Apostolic Church in Troy New York.

We cannot be grateful enough for how much our partnership with this church has brought joy to the lives of people in the community.

Service is a part of our vision at Protect A girls Image Organization.

We have a community development model that requires us to have long-term relationships and collaborations with local organizations, churches, and stakeholders committed to transform our community.

We believe the justice of God is always restorative. God is constantly working to restore systems, communities, families, and humanity.

For us to be a just and generous Organization, we serve as a way to partner with God in bringing restoration to all things.

Agape Church of Deliverance believes that there is ONE LORD, ONE FAITH AND ONE BAPTISM.

They teach and believe that Jesus is Lord and they invite everyone to a Holy Ghost filled Anointed Services where God’s unconditional LOVE (AGAPE) saturates the atmosphere!

Our goal of forming relationships with a church or community overseas is to deepen our connection as Christians.

It helps us to better educate each other about what life is like in a different country/culture.

We have become involved in each other’s efforts to make our communities closer to the vision that God has for us.

We believe that everyone has been given gifts and resources by God.

These resources (material, spiritual, emotional, relational, financial, and others) should be used for the greater good of God’s kingdom.

We see close relationships between distant churches as a way to share the resources and knowledge that we have with each other.

Why Should a Non-Profit partner with a Church?

  • Our Organization and Agape Church’s relationship can help us both express our unity in Christ which transcends national, ethnic, economic, linguistic and other barriers.
  • We are both encouraged as we see God working in one another.
  • Agape Church and our Organization serve as we use our spiritual gifts, skills, abilities, and professional knowledge.
  • We both experience Spiritual growth, Revitalization and Community transformation.
  • Agape Church has played a big role in encouraging and supporting us.
  • Creative and innovative ministries are limitless.

 

RELATED CONTENT: Protect A Girls Image In Collaboration with the Church in Providing Hospice Services.

PGIO Lynden Church Hospice

 

Agape Apostolic church in New York has partnered with Protect A Girls Image in the following ways:

 

EDUCATION

Effects of Poverty on Education in Kirinyaga County- Kenya.

PGIO believes that the best way to build a stronger Africa is to foster future African leaders from diverse backgrounds.

We find bright children living on the edges of society and provides them with long-term, quality education, leadership, and critical thinking skills.

We provide them with resources they need to become leaders in their communities and beyond. Our beneficiaries come from families stricken by AIDS, Illiteracy, and poverty.

They don’t lack ambition, they only need resources to make their dreams come true – that’s where we come in!

We have very kind sponsors from Agape Church who have made a great impact on educating our Beneficiaries. We have also run a crowdfunding campaign to raise school fees for our beneficiaries.

They have provided promising children an opportunity to attend the best local schools in the region, where they gain the skills and confidence to become leaders.

 

SCRIPTURES/ EVANGELISM

Evangelism

Agape Church always reminds us that each of us is created in the image of God, filled with potential and worth.

As we respond to God’s call to care for our brothers and sisters in poverty, we seek to celebrate their inherent, God-breathed value.

Traditional models of charity often emphasize what those in poverty lack—overlooking their unique skills, abilities, and drive.

We believe that a scriptural approach affirms the dignity and value of those we seek to help.

We believe families in poverty have the God-given talents and skills to provide for their families.

What they don’t have is a lump sum of money to invest in their potential—by paying school fees, saving for the future, or investing in businesses.

 

ADVOCACY

PGIO Advocacy Work

Pastor Paulette Camp has a great influence on the Grass-roots level. She runs a ministry called “I AM MY SISTER’S KEEPER”. It is an uplifting and motivational Program that seeks to advocate for random acts of kindness to women. Paulette Camp also encourages us to push Advocacy work here in Kenya.

We have worked together to influence the decisions, policies, and practices of powerful decision-makers. We are advocating for change where they will address underlying causes of poverty in Kirinyaga County, bring justice and support good development.

Through our pieces of training, initiatives, and programs, the Organization builds community capacity to mobilize civic action.

 

EMPOWERMENT

Empowerment

The Church started an Initiative called the Agape Sparkles Youth Program. The Program strives to build the strength of the community by empowering youth to maximize their spiritual, personal, and educational potential.

The mission is to teach, lead and live the Christian life, using all appropriate methods to excite, inspire, capture and ignite young people for Jesus.

PGIO also works to empower our community and beneficiaries by giving them the tools to help themselves break out of the cycle of generational poverty. We educate children about sexual consent, the importance of staying in school and to our girls we teach about menstrual hygiene.

Our work is all about DEVELOPMENT, not charity; DIGNITY, not shame.

We believe all humans are created in the image of God. We will always promote the dignity and worth of people and families.

 

FOOD

PGIO Food Drive

Agape Church has a Bread of life community outreach program run by Minister Anthony Lewis.

They give free food and supplies to members of the Community every 4th Saturday of every month from 11 am to 3 pm.

PGIO also plays a big role in feeding the poor in Kirinyaga County.

We have scheduled outreach programs where we distribute maize flour, sugar, cooking oil, rice, beans, soap, tissue, and tea leaves just to mention a few.

We distribute clothes, shoes, underwear, and jackets too for the cold seasons. We believe that if a child is well fed and clothed, he or she will be able to stay in school. We don’t underestimate the power of a hot meal in a child’s life.

 

INCASE YOU MISSED IT:

An Incredible Story Of Child Marriage.

10 Ways to Teach Your Children Consent at Every Age.

Catcalling is Not A Compliment, It’s Harassment.

 

SUMMARY

When we are drawn to respond to a particular area of suffering and need, we reflect the heart of our Heavenly Father, who is grieved by all forms of injustice.

Protect A Girls Image, through Christ-centered economic development, addresses the root of many issues like child marriage, illiteracy, hunger, and homelessness by dealing with the underlying causes of poverty and hopelessness.

Together we can share the love of God in word and deed, building His Kingdom and growing our faith as we invite Him to work through us.

Our Girl Susan Wambui always says, “I am so grateful that Jesus heard my prayers and sent a sponsor to provide an education that has changed my life.”

We pray that through the many Ministries offered by PGIO, that many lives will be changed, in ways to restore people to Jesus Christ and provide hope for a bright future.

Jesus gave us the blueprint when he said these words “a new commandment I give to you, that you love one another, as I have loved you, that you also love one another. By this, all will know that you are my disciples if you have a love for one another”

John 13:34-35

 

10 Tips on How Parents can Help Children who Have Experienced Trauma.

As much as parents try to keep their children safe, it is not always possible be to protect them from impending traumatic experiences. In the wake of a traumatic event, your comfort, support and reassurance as a parent can make children feel safe, help them manage their fears, guide them through their grief, and help them recover in a healthy way.

Before I get into it, let us first be clear what trauma is.

What Is Trauma?

Trauma is an emotional response to an intense event that threatens or causes harm. The harm can be physical or emotional, real or perceived, and it can threaten the child or someone close to him or her. Trauma can be the result of a single event, or it can result from exposure to multiple events over time.

Potentially traumatic events may include:

  • Abuse (physical, sexual, or emotional).
  • Effects of poverty (such as homelessness or not having enough to eat).
  • Being separated from loved ones.
  • Witnessing harm to a loved one or pet.
  • Natural disasters or accidents.
  • Unpredictable parental behavior due to addiction or mental illness among many other things that affect a child.

 

 How does Trauma affect your children?

The intense, confusing, and frightening emotions that follow a traumatic event or natural disaster can be even more pronounced in children and teens. Such events can undermine their sense of security, leaving them feeling helpless and vulnerable—especially if the event stemmed from an act of violence, such as a physical assault, mass shooting, or terrorist attack. Even kids or teens not directly affected by a disaster can become traumatized when repeatedly exposed to horrific images of the event on the news or social media.

1. Bodies

  • Inability to control physical responses to stress
  • Chronic illness, even into adulthood (heart disease, obesity.

2. Brains (Thinking)

  • Difficulty thinking, learning, and concentrating
  • Impaired memory
  • Difficulty switching from one thought or activity to another

3. Emotions (feeling)

  • Low self-esteem
  • Feeling unsafe
  • Inability to regulate emotions
  • Difficulty forming attachments to caregivers
  • Trouble with friendships
  • Trust issues
  • Depression, anxiety Behavior
  • Lack of impulse control
  • Fighting, aggression, running away
  • Substance abuse
  • Suicide

 

RELATED CONTENT: Ten Ways to teach your children about consent at every age.

How do you help your child heal from trauma?

1. TEACH YOUR CHILD TO TALK.

It is important to remember two words when working with anyone experiencing trauma and hurt: “hope” and “encouragement.” This isn’t about telling someone they should paint over all their problems with happy thoughts. Instead, it is about offering a way out from the despair left over from trauma.

Talk to your child about what happened. There is no way to manage trauma without at least acknowledging that it happened. Most people are raised in homes where no one talks about “the elephant in the room.” But if you want to help a person heal from any type of hurt or trauma, it is important to discuss it.

Once you begin talking about difficult subjects, you give your child permission to as well. You are teaching them it is okay to talk about these things.

Reassure your child. The event was not their fault, you love them, and it’s OK for them to feel upset, angry, or scared.

Don’t pressure your child into talking. It can be very difficult for some kids to talk about a traumatic experience. A young child may find it easier to draw a picture illustrating their feelings rather than talk about them. You can then talk with your child about what they’ve drawn.

Be honest. While you should tailor the information you share according to your child’s age, honesty is important. Don’t say nothing’s wrong if something is wrong.

Do “normal” activities with your child that have nothing to do with the traumatic event. Encourage your child to seek out friends and pursue games, sports, and hobbies that they enjoyed before the incident. Go on family outings to the park or beach, enjoy a games night, or watch a funny or uplifting movie together.

 

2. ENCOURAGE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY.

Physical activity can burn off adrenaline, release mood-enhancing endorphins, and help your child sleep better at night.

Find a sport that your child enjoys. Activities such as basketball, soccer, running, martial arts, or swimming that require moving both the arms and legs can help rouse your child’s nervous system from that “stuck” feeling that often follows a traumatic experience.

Offer to participate in sports, games, or physical activities with your child. If they seem resistant to get off the couch, play some of their favorite music and dance together. Once a child gets moving, they’ll start to feel more energetic.

Encourage your child to go outside to play with friends or a pet and blow off steam.

Schedule a family outing to a hiking trail, swimming pool, or park.

Take younger children to a playground, activity center, or arrange play dates.

 

3. TEACH YOUR CHILD TO TRUST THEMSELVES.

Children are often impressionable. It is so easy to teach a child that they cannot trust themselves. Particularly in abusive homes, children are taught not to feel or to think on their own. They are usually taught to do what their parent says without question and to overlook their own experiences.

Teaching a child to trust their intuition is not overly difficult, though it often takes time. Start by having a discussion with your child about how important it is to trust one’s own inner voice, or conscience. Continue asking your child how they feel about certain experiences. This act will help your child learn that to look inside is an important aspect of life.

 

4. MINIMIZE MEDIA EXPOSURE.

Children who’ve experienced a traumatic event can often find relentless media coverage to be further traumatizing. Excessive exposure to images of a disturbing event—such as repeatedly viewing video clips on social media or news sites—can even create traumatic stress in children or teens who were not directly affected by the event.

Limit your child’s media exposure to the traumatic event. Don’t let your child watch the news or check social media just before bed, and make use of parental controls on the TV, computer, and tablet to prevent your child from repeatedly viewing disturbing footage.

As much as you can, watch news reports of the traumatic event with your child. You can reassure your child as you’re watching and help place information in context.

Avoid exposing your child to graphic images and videos. It’s often less traumatizing for a child or teen to read the newspaper rather than watch television coverage or view video clips of the event.

 

5. SHOW YOUR CHILD HOW TO GRIEVE.

Most children (and really, most adults) are not taught how to grieve. Most people are taught “Don’t cry,” “Keep difficult emotions to yourself,” “Be strong,” “Move on,” and other similar methods of coping with loss. When working with emotionally injured children, you can best help them by not only teaching them how to talk about their feelings, but also about how to grieve.

How do you do this? There are a couple of ways:

One is through personal example. Here, you demonstrate your own grief about something.

Another is when you ask your child questions, such as, “What do you miss about so-and-so?” Or, “If you could talk to so-and-so, what would you say?” Try to ask open-ended questions that generate feelings.

Grieving involves processing through feelings until they are complete. Children need not analyze this concept. They just need permission to talk, cry, be angry, and express their emotions until they are done. Grief is finished when it’s finished. There is no timeline for grief, and everyone processes emotions on their own schedule. Talk to your child about these concepts and give them permission to “process” through any feelings at their own pace.

 

6. FEED YOUR CHILD A HEALTHY DIET.

The food your child eats can have a profound impact on their mood and ability to cope with traumatic stress. Processed and convenience food, sugary foods and snacks can create mood swings and worsen symptoms of traumatic stress. Conversely, eating plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables, high-quality protein, and healthy fats, especially omega-3 fatty acids, can help your child better cope with the ups and downs that follow a disturbing experience.

Focus on overall diet rather than specific foods. Kids should be eating whole, minimally processed food—food that is as close to its natural form as possible.

Limit fried food, sweet desserts, sugary snacks and cereals, and refined flour. These can all exacerbate symptoms of traumatic stress in kids.

Be a role model. The childhood impulse to imitate is strong so don’t ask your child to eat vegetables while you gorge on soda and French fries.

Cook more meals at home. Restaurant and takeout meals have more added sugar and unhealthy fat so cooking at home can have a huge impact on your kids’ health. If you make large batches, cooking just a few times can be enough to feed your family for the whole week.

Make mealtimes about more than just food. Gathering the family around a table for a meal is an ideal opportunity to talk and listen to your child without the distraction of TV, phones, or computers.

 

7. TEACH YOUR CHILD ABOUT BOUNDARIES.

One important topic you can introduce to your child is the concept of boundaries. Boundaries can be physical and emotional. Physical boundaries include a person’s body and physical space. Emotional boundaries include how a person is treated emotionally, mentally, and psychologically.

Art is one effective intervention for teaching children this concept. You can draw a picture of a line, wall, or some type of boundary indicator. On one side of the line, write down attributes of healthy boundaries, such as, “respect,” or “does not touch me in a way that is unsafe.” On the “boundary violation” side of the barrier, write a list of unhealthy boundary violators, such as “name calling,” or “yelling.” You and your child can create this drawing together.

Of course, you will need to use age-appropriate language. The main concern is to teach your child emotional intelligence and about how to protect themselves from unsafe relationships.

 

8. IDENTIFY THE ‘HURT SELF’ AND THE ‘STRONG SELF’.

Teach your child that it is okay to talk about difficult memories. Explain that they have a “hurt self” that needs to be healed. In addition, let your child know they aren’t only hurt, but that they also have a “healthy self” or “strong self” capable of overcoming hard things. The strong self will help heal the hurt self.

To help your child identify what is hurt, you can ask questions about thoughts, fears, feelings, and dreams. See if your child can identify how they experience the pain from the trauma they have endured. If your child is not interested in going that deep, just talk to them. Say, “I know you are hurt. Here are some suggestions for helping yourself heal.”

It is helpful for parents and other significant leaders in a child’s life to learn how to teach them important life lessons, especially those involving emotions. Since most people generally do not understand emotional health, this can prove challenging—mainly, because most people haven’t been taught themselves.

I recommend drawing two pictures for your child: one a hurt child, and one a healthy child. The hurt child could look sad and have tears. The strong child could look steadfast and concerned. Teach your child that these two “parts of self” exist within them, and that their job is to learn how to nurture and heal the hurt part of the self.

 

9. REBUILD TRUST AND SAFETY.

Trauma can alter the way a child sees the world, making it suddenly seem a much more dangerous and frightening place. Your child may find it more difficult to trust both their environment and other people. You can help by rebuilding your child’s sense of safety and security.

Create routines. Establishing a predictable structure and schedule to your child’s or teen’s life can help to make the world seem more stable again. Try to maintain regular times for meals, homework, and family activities.

Minimize stress at home. Try to make sure your child has space and time for rest, play, and fun.

Manage your own stress. The more calm, relaxed and focused you are, the better you’ll be able to help your child.

Speak of the future and make plans. This can help counteract the common feeling among traumatized children that the future is scary, bleak, and unpredictable.

Keep your promises. You can help to rebuild your child’s trust by being trustworthy. Be consistent and follow through on what you say you’re going to do.

If you don’t know the answer to a question, don’t be afraid to admit it. Don’t jeopardize your child’s trust in you by making something up.

Remember that children often personalize situations. They may worry about their own safety even if the traumatic event occurred far away. Reassure your child and help place the situation in context.

 

 10. IDENTIFY HURTING BELIEFS AND HEALING BELIEFS.

Help your child identify things they tell themselves about life or personal identity. Beliefs children often have when hurt tend to be very personalized; beliefs such as, “I am unlovable,” “The world is not safe,” or “I will never be happy again.” Any type of negative, devaluing belief can be ingrained in a child’s head for years, decades, or even a lifetime. It is beneficial to help your child identify these beliefs early on.

Have your child write down a list of unhealthy beliefs. Some include thoughts such as, “If I were a better child, my mother would not be on drugs,” “If I were thinner, my friend would not have rejected me,” or “I need to be a perfect student to have a good life.” If your child is old enough, work with them to identify unhealthy beliefs.

Once these unhealthy thoughts have been identified, make a list of helpful, healing beliefs for your child to replace the unhealthy thoughts. After this, remind your child to replace the unhealthy beliefs with the healthy beliefs. Make sure they understand this process is building an essential inner recovery “muscle” and will require practice to develop.

 

When should you seek treatment for your child’s trauma?

Usually, your child’s feelings of anxiety, numbness, confusion, guilt, and despair following a traumatic event will start to fade within a relatively short time. However, if the traumatic stress reaction is so intense and persistent that it’s interfering with your child’s ability to function at school or home, they may need help from a mental health professional—preferably a trauma specialist.

Warning signs include:

  • Six weeks have passed, and your child is not feeling any better.
  • Your child is having trouble functioning at school.
  • Your child is experiencing terrifying memories, nightmares, or flashbacks.
  • Physical complaints such as headaches, stomach pains, or sleep disturbances.
  • Your child is having an increasingly difficult time relating to friends and family.
  • Your child or teen is experiencing suicidal thoughts.
  • Your child is avoiding more and more things that remind them of the traumatic event.

When children experience abuse, abandonment or other deep hurts, the adults in their lives may not know how to help them. Many people believe topics like psychological healing only belong to the professionals. But “professionals,” however helpful they may be, do not have enough time to impact children in the same way as those who are involved with them daily.

Whatever the age of your child, it’s important to offer extra reassurance and support following a traumatic event. A child’s reaction to a disaster or trauma can be greatly influenced by their parents’ response, so it’s important to educate yourself about trauma and traumatic stress. The more you know about the symptoms, effects, and treatment options, the better equipped you’ll be to help your child recover. With your love and support, the unsettling thoughts and feelings of traumatic stress can start to fade and your child’s life can return to normal in the days or weeks following the event.

Effects of Poverty on Education in Kirinyaga County- Kenya.

 

Juliet Wanja, Doreen Karimi  and Christine Wanjiru are all 15 year old girls who are not sure if they will join High School in 2020 due to lack of school fees. This is a reality for thousands of children in Kenya right now. Currently, the Kenyan primary education is free but still regular school attendance is a challenge mainly due to low family incomes.

For instance, over 1.2 million children of school-going age are out of school and involved in practices such as child labor to supplement family income. There is also a 27% primary school dropout rate related to poverty issues. Imagine having these challenges in primary education. We find that fewer children are enrolled in secondary school, with only about a 40% enrollment rate.

Ending poverty in all of its form everywhere is crucial to achieving sustainable development in the world. We encourage various stakeholders to invest in education of our Beneficiaries because there is a lot to be gained in terms of poverty alleviation since poverty is a challenge to education.

It’s a bit ironic that we are fighting for our children to go to school while at the same time, our poor quality education is another one of the causes of poverty in Kenya. A high number of children are cramped together in classrooms, there are minimal teaching materials and each class has a single teacher.

With a poor teacher to student ratio, children who learn differently end up getting left behind because the teacher does not have a chance to serve each child individually. Those children who are left behind remain enrolled in school until they can catch up, adding to the amount of resources needed, since there is not an even ratio of new students to graduated students.

However, Protect a Girls’ Image Organization believes that education has a direct correlation with income. The higher the level of education, the less likely the person is to fall below poverty line.

Educating girls in particular makes them more likely to take control of decisions relating to fertility, family welfare, health. This means that education is not just a need but a tool to alleviate poverty.

With Donations from well wishers like you in place this shouldn’t be a problem. It seems simple enough – at least on the face of it. Every child in our care between the ages of six and 17 has the right to compulsory education and this cannot happen without your kind donations.

Have you seen our latest Fundraising Campaign for School Fees for our 40 children in our care? Click Here>>>  https://t.co/rFenbUMW4w

 

What is the right to education?

Education is a basic human right for all and is important for everyone to make the most of their lives. Other human rights include the right to freedom from slavery or torture and to a fair trial.

Having an education helps people to access all of their other human rights. Education improves an individual’s chances in life and helps to tackle poverty.

 

Why does it matter?

Education reduces poverty, decreases social inequalities, empowers children and helps each individual reach their full potential.

It also brings significant economic returns for a country and helps societies to achieve lasting peace and sustainable development. Education is key to achieving all other human rights.

Education that targets poor populations like where our children live will bring change to many of the systemic factors that have contributed to the delay in poor communities’ development. Education can prevent the transmission of poverty between generations. Education also has documented effect on health, nutrition, economic development and on environmental protection (UNESCO 2104: Sustainable development begins with education).

Our goal in 2020 is to make sure all our children are enrolled in school with all the supplies which include ( school fees, a school bag, books, and writing materials)

Despite great progress we have made this year, 12 out of our 40 children are still not enrolled in school.

Would you like to help one of these children to be enrolled in school? We will be so grateful if you Give trough this link>>>>>>  https://t.co/rFenbUMW4w

 

 REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD INVEST IN A CHILD’S EDUCATION.

Investing in Education yields significant development benefits.

Education reduces poverty, boosts economic growth and increases income. It increases a person’s chances of having a healthy life, reduces maternal deaths, and combats diseases such as HIV and AIDS. Education can promote gender equality, reduce child marriage, and promote peace. In sum, education is one of the most important investments a country can make in its people and its future.

Education is essential to the success of every one of the 17 global goals.

Formally adopted at the UN General Assembly in September 2015, the Global Goals for Sustainable Development frame the global development agenda for 2016-2030. The Global Goal 4 on education aims to “ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all.”

Education is Critical during times of conflict.

In times of conflict and crisis, children are forced out of school, which contributes to higher drop-out rates and lower completion rates. Having a strong focus on education in these countries is critical, since education promotes stability, good governance, and peace. It can also provide a visible sign of a return to normalcy for children.

A Poor quality education is almost like no education.

Great progress has been achieved in enrolling children in school around the world. But it’s not enough to get children in school, we also need to ensure that they learn to read, count, and acquire the necessary life skills. A special focus has to be given to the most vulnerable and marginalized groups (including children living in fragile and conflict affected areas, children with disabilities and girls) who are most likely to be affected because of a lack of well-trained  teachers, inadequate learning materials, and unsuitable education infrastructure.

Achieving the Global Goal for education by 2030 cost US $1.25 a day per child in Developing countries.

It costs on average US $1.25  a day per child in developing countries (low and lower-middle income) to provide a full cycle of pre-primary through secondary education (13 years). The largest share of this cost, 88%, is borne by the developing countries themselves. The international community should help in filling the funding gap of just 15 cents a day per child.

Education has a multiplier effect.

Educated girls and women tend to be healthier, have fewer children, earn more income and provide better health care for themselves and their future children. These benefits also are transmitted from generation to generation and across communities at large, making girls’ education one of the best investments a country can make.

Children with disabilities are often excluded from education systems.

In many countries, a combination of discrimination, social attitudes, poverty, lack of political will, and poor quality of human and material resources leave children with disabilities more vulnerable to being excluded from education. It is essential that societies adapt their education systems to ensure that these children can enjoy their basic human right without discrimination of any kind.

Early childhood education is vital to lifelong success.

Investing in quality early childhood education brings the highest returns from individuals, societies and countries. Children who have access to quality early childhood programs do better in primary school and will have better education outcomes later. It is vital that low and lower middle-income countries invest more in affordable early childhood programs.

Read More: Operation: Help Send our 17 boys and 23 girls back to School in 2020.

Skills that Fathers should teach their 13 year old Daughters in 2020.